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Occupational identity, work, and burnout among managers: Do high performance human resource management practices play a moderator role?

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dc.contributor.author Hamouche, Salima
dc.contributor.author Marchand, Alain
dc.date.accessioned 2021-02-21T06:47:08Z
dc.date.available 2021-02-21T06:47:08Z
dc.date.copyright © 2021
dc.date.issued 2021
dc.identifier.citation Hamouche, S. & Marchand, A. (2021). Occupational identity, work, and burnout among managers: Do high performance human resource management practices play a moderator role? Journal of Workplace Behavioral Health, 36(1), 24-47. https://doi.org/10.1080/15555240.2021.1877553 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 15555240
dc.identifier.uri https://doi.org/10.1080/15555240.2021.1877553
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12519/336
dc.description This article is not available at CUD collection. The version of scholarly record of this article is published in Journal of Workplace Behavioral Health (2021), available online at: https://doi.org/10.1080/15555240.2021.1877553 en_US
dc.description.abstract This study seeks to examine the association between managers’ occupational identity, high performance management practices, and managers’ burnout. We propose a theoretical model that integrates identity theory into stress and human resource management research. We investigate the proposition that a weak verification of manager’s identity will be associated with a higher level of burnout, and that high-performance human resource management practices (HPHRMPs) moderate this association. Data came from SALVEO, a cross-sectional study conducted in the province of Quebec (Canada). Data were obtained from 314 managers nested in 56 workplaces. The results show a significant association between a low level of verification of some standards of the manager’s identity and burnout, mainly work demands and recognition. Thus, a low level of identity verification regarding work demands is associated with a low level of burnout. While a low level of identity verification regarding recognition is associated with a high level of burnout. HPHRMPs do not moderate the relation between managers’ verification of occupational identity and burnout. Seldom are studies that have analyzed the link between managers’ occupational identity, burnout, and HPHRMPs. By integrating the theory of identity, the theoretical model developed in this research offers a new perspective to explain managers’ burnout. © 2021 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Routledge en_US
dc.relation Authors Affiliations : Hamouche, S., Faculty of Management, Canadian University Dubai, Dubai, United Arab Emirates; Marchand, A., School of Industrial Relations, University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada
dc.relation.ispartofseries Journal of Workplace Behavioral Health;
dc.rights Taylor & Francis grants reuse rights for Taylor and Francis created article abstracts free
dc.subject burnout en_US
dc.subject high performance management practices en_US
dc.subject human resource management en_US
dc.subject manager en_US
dc.subject stress en_US
dc.subject Work identity en_US
dc.title Occupational identity, work, and burnout among managers: Do high performance human resource management practices play a moderator role? en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.rights.holder Copyright : © 2021 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


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