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The phylogenetic range of bacterial and viral pathogens of vertebrates

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dc.contributor.author Shaw, Liam P.
dc.contributor.author Wang, Alethea D.
dc.contributor.author Dylus, David
dc.contributor.author Meier, Magda
dc.contributor.author Pogacnik, Grega
dc.contributor.author Dessimoz, Christophe
dc.contributor.author Balloux, François
dc.date.accessioned 2020-06-15T10:33:29Z
dc.date.available 2020-06-15T10:33:29Z
dc.date.copyright 2020
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.citation Shaw, L. P., Wang, A. D., Dylus, D., Meier, M., Pogacnik, G., Dessimoz, C., & Balloux, F. (2020). The phylogenetic range of bacterial and viral pathogens of vertebrates. Molecular Ecology. https://doi.org/10.1111/mec.15463 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 09621083
dc.identifier.uri https://doi.org/10.1111/mec.15463
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12519/219
dc.description This article is not available at CUD collection. The version of scholarly record of this article is published in Molecular Ecology (2020), available online at: https://doi.org/10.1111/mec.15463 en_US
dc.description.abstract Many major human pathogens are multihost pathogens, able to infect other vertebrate species. Describing the general patterns of host–pathogen associations across pathogen taxa is therefore important to understand risk factors for human disease emergence. However, there is a lack of comprehensive curated databases for this purpose, with most previous efforts focusing on viruses. Here, we report the largest manually compiled host–pathogen association database, covering 2,595 bacteria and viruses infecting 2,656 vertebrate hosts. We also build a tree for host species using nine mitochondrial genes, giving a quantitative measure of the phylogenetic similarity of hosts. We find that the majority of bacteria and viruses are specialists infecting only a single host species, with bacteria having a significantly higher proportion of specialists compared to viruses. Conversely, multihost viruses have a more restricted host range than multihost bacteria. We perform multiple analyses of factors associated with pathogen richness per host species and the pathogen traits associated with greater host range and zoonotic potential. We show that factors previously identified as important for zoonotic potential in viruses—such as phylogenetic range, research effort, and being vector-borne—are also predictive in bacteria. We find that the fraction of pathogens shared between two hosts decreases with the phylogenetic distance between them. Our results suggest that host phylogenetic similarity is the primary factor for host-switching in pathogens. © 2020 The Authors. Molecular Ecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd en_US
dc.description.sponsorship European Research Council Schweizerischer Nationalfonds zur Förderung der Wissenschaftlichen Forschung en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Blackwell Publishing Ltd en_US
dc.relation Authors Affiliations : Shaw, L.P., UCL Genetics Institute, University College London, London, United Kingdom, Nuffield Department of Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; Wang, A.D., UCL Genetics Institute, University College London, London, United Kingdom, Canadian University Dubai, Dubai, United Arab Emirates; Dylus, D., Department of Computational Biology, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland, Center for Integrative Genomics, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland, Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Lausanne, Switzerland; Meier, M., UCL Genetics Institute, University College London, London, United Kingdom, Genetics and Genomic Medicine, University College London Institute of Child Health, London, United Kingdom; Pogacnik, G., UCL Genetics Institute, University College London, London, United Kingdom; Dessimoz, C., Department of Computational Biology, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland, Center for Integrative Genomics, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland, Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Lausanne, Switzerland, Department of Genetics Evolution and Environment, Centre for Life's Origins and Evolution, University College London, London, United Kingdom, Department of Computer Science, University College London, London, United Kingdom; Balloux, F., UCL Genetics Institute, University College London, London, United Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofseries Molecular Ecology;
dc.rights Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject emerging infectious diseases en_US
dc.subject phylogenetics en_US
dc.subject zoonotic diseases en_US
dc.subject host jumps en_US
dc.subject host range en_US
dc.title The phylogenetic range of bacterial and viral pathogens of vertebrates en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.rights.holder Copyright : © 2020 The Authors. Molecular Ecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd


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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

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